Showing 637 results

Authority record

Zera, Annette

  • Person

Annette Zera was made an Honorary Doctor of Education of the University in November 2003.

Young Woman Engineer of the Year

  • Corporate body
  • 1978-

The award was first presented in 1978 at the instigation of the Caroline Hasslet Memorial Trust and Institution of Electronic and Electrical Technician Engineers (now the Institution of Engineering and Technology). It was initially called the Girl Technician of the Year award and was renamed the Young Woman Engineer of the Year in 1988.

Woodford Jubilee Hospital

  • Corporate body
  • 1899-1986

From Lost Hospitals of London: https://ezitis.myzen.co.uk/woodfordjubilee.html The Hospital, financed by Sir John Roberts, Bt, was built to celebrate Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee. It opened in 1899 with 12 beds. The patients were looked after by their GPs. In 1911 it was extended to 54 beds, the money being raised by public subscription. In 1937 a new X-ray room and apparatus were installed. The women's ward was extended, with an additional 6 beds. The work cost £3,877. In 1948 the Hospital joined the NHS under the control of the Forest Group Hospital Management Committee, part of the North East Metropolitan Regional Hospital Board. In 1974, following a major reorganisation of the NHS, it came under the administration of the West Roding District Health Authority, part of the North East Thames Regional Health Board. Following another major reorganisation of the NHS in 1982, it transferred to the control of the Waltham Forest District Health Authority. The Hospital closed in 1986 under the orders of the then Health Minister, Ke eth Clarke, because it was considered too small, with only 47 beds.

Wood, Helen; Dr

  • Person

Staff member, Faculty of Education, Human & Social Studies, Polytechnic of the South Bank.

Wilson, Michael Gregg

  • Person
  • 1942-

Michael Gregg Wilson is a producer and screenwriter of many of the James Bond films. He was made an Honorary Doctor of Letters in 2013.

Whipps Cross Hospital

  • AR/11
  • Corporate body
  • 1889-present

From Lost Hospitals of London: https://ezitis.myzen.co.uk/whippscross.html In 1889 the West Ham Guardians bought Forest House and its estate of 44 acres of grounds as a site for a future infirmary, for which pla ing approval was granted in 1894. The old mansion house was then used from that year as an a exe to the West Ham Union workhouse in Leyton to accommodate elderly infirm men. Building work on the new infirmary began in 1900 and was completed three years later, having cost over £186,000. The West Ham Union Infirmary opened in 1903. It comprised a central administration building with ward blocks on either side.nAlthough originally there had been no operating theatre, this was soon added, although it was known as the 'operating room' as the word 'theatre' was considered to be too alarming to the patients. By 1912 some 350 operations a year were being performed. During WW1, in 1917 part of the Infirmary became the Whipps Cross War Hospital. It was affiliated to the Colchester Military Hospital and 240 beds were given over for wounded and sick servicemen. King George V and Queen Mary visited in November 1917, commenting on the magnificence of the buildings. The Queen presented medals and certificates to the nurses who has passed their Final examinations that years. By the end of the war in 1918 the Infirmary had become a general hospital. Its name was changed to Whipps Cross Hospital. During the 1920s the first specialist consultants were appointed to the medical staff. They established departments in dermatology, ophthalmology, genitourinary surgery and ear, nose and throat conditions. In 1926 the Board of Guardians who managed the Hospital were dismissed by Neville Chamberlain, the Minister of Health, as they had run up a debt of £250,000. In 1930 the Boards of Guardians were abolished and control of the Hospital was taken over by West Ham Borough Council. The Council added new ward blocks and, by 1936, the Hospital had 741 beds and had been recognised as a training school for nurses. During the years 1938-1940 four new blocks were built at the eastern end of the original buildings. During WW2 the Hospital joined the Emergency Medical Service, with 388 of its 744 beds reserved for civilian air-raid casualties. In 1948 the Hospital joined the NHS under the control of the Leytonstone Group Hospital Management Committee, part of the North East Metropolitan Regional Hospital Board. It had 1,044 beds, of which 846 were open. In 1951 the Wilfred Lawson Temperance Hotel in Woodford Green was purchased by the Regional Hospital Board as additional accommodation for 50 nurses. The Hospital Management Committee decided to use the premises also as a Preliminary Training School for student nurses; this opened on a temporary basis in October 1951. The nurses' badges bore the Hospital's motto: Semper ad coelum (always aim high). In 1963, when the Hospital had 978 beds, it transferred to the control of the Forest Group Hospital Management Committee. In 1965 a Medical Education Centre opened. It was one of the first in England. An Intensive Care Unit opened in 1968, as did a Hyperbaric Unit. In 1974, following a major reorganisation of the NHS, the Hospital came under the control of the West Roding District Health Authority, part of the Redbridge and Waltham Forest Area Health Authority of the North East Thames Regional Health Authority. It had 862 beds. The Medical Education Centre was extended the same year. In 1982, after another major reorganisation of the NHS, the Hospital came under the administration of the Waltham Forest District Health Authority. In 1987 the Margaret Centre opened to provide palliative care for patients with life-limiting illnesses. In 1992, following the introduction of more reforms of the NHS, the Hospital became a trust - the Forest Healthcare NHS Trust. By 1997 the Hospital was in deep financial crisis, with a deficit of £4m. The long waits in the Accident & Emergency Department for patients on trolleys, cancelled operations and neglect of elderly patients on wards placed it as the second worst in the whole country for complaints (it is not stated which was the first). In 2001 the Forest Healthcare NHS Trust was dissolved and the Hospital came under the management of the Whipps Cross University Hospital NHS Trust. The Hospital celebrated its centenary in 2003. A new Emergency Medical Centre was opened. Work began in 2011 at the northern part of the site for a new £23m Emergency and Urgent Care Centre, which opened in May 2012. The building incorporates the former Accident and Emergency Department and the Walk-In Centre. Because of the continuing financial problems and uncertainties over its future, a scheme for redevelopment of the site intended to begin in 2012 was abandoned. Instead, early in 2011, the Trust negotiated with the Barts and the London NHS Trust and the Newham University Hospital NHS Trust to create a new trust. The mergers were successful and the Barts Health NHS Trust came into being on 1st April 2012, the largest NHS Trust in the country. €¨Newham Archives, Stratford Reference Library, holds administrative records from 1900-1957, ephemera from 1917-1957 and pictoral records from 1900-1939. Waltham Forest Archives holds administrative records from 1875-1975, including staff records from 1932.

Whipps Cross campus, South Bank University

  • AR/31
  • Corporate body
  • 2001-2011

Whipps Cross campus was established in 2001, along with Havering Campus, after South Bank University merged with the Redwood College of Health Studies. The campus closed in 2011.

WGM

  • Person

Wanstead Hospital

  • AR/14
  • Corporate body
  • 1938-1986

From Lost Hospitals of London https://ezitis.myzen.co.uk/wanstead.html The Essex County Hospital opened in 1938 in a building originally erected in 1861 as the Merchant Seamen's Orphan Asylum. (Prince Albert, the husband of Queen Victoria, had laid the foundation stone.) In 1921 the orphans moved to Bearwood House in Wokingham and the Asylum building was bought by the Convent of the Good Shepherd as a refuge for women and girls. In 1937 Essex County Council bought the building and converted it into a hospital. The Hospital joined the NHS in 1948 as a general hospital with 202 beds. It had suffered considerable damage during the war and a proposal was made to develop a larger hospital on the 7 acre site. However, these plans came to naught. The war damage was repaired and by 1961 the Hospital had 195 beds. The maternity service was withdrawn in 1975 and the Hospital finally closed in 1986 with 188 beds. Services were transferred to Whipps Cross Hospital.

The hospital was part of the Forest Group School of Nursing, centred on Whipps Cross Hospital, training nurses for both the Register and the Roll.

Wandsworth Road building

  • Corporate body
  • 1970-2003

Wandsworth Road building was purpose-built to house South Bank Polytechnic's Faculty of the Built Environment and Vauxhall College of Further Education. The foundation stone was laid in 1970 and the buildings were in use by 1973, although was not officially opened until 1975. In 2003 the building was sold and has since been converted to private residential flats.

Wanamaker, Zoë

  • Person
  • 1949-

Zoë Wanamaker was made an Honorary Doctor of Letters in October 1995.

von Hippel, Frank

  • AR/33
  • Person
  • 1937-

Frank von Hippel is a theoretical physicist. Frank received his B.S. in physics from the Massachusetts Insti­tute of Technology in 1959 and a D.Phil. in theoretical physics in 1962 from the University of Oxford, where he was a Rhodes Scholar. For the following ten years, his research was primarily in theoretical elementary-particle physics, and he held research positions at the University of Chi­cago, Cornell University, and Argonne National Laboratory, and served on the physics faculty at Stanford University.

In 1974, Frank’s interests shifted to “public policy physics.” He spent a year as a resident fellow at the National Academy of Sciences, where he organized the American Physical Society’s study on light-water reactor safety. He was then invited to join the Princeton research staff in 1974 and in 1983 was appointed to the teaching faculty at Princeton at the rank of professor.

Frank has worked on policy proposals relating to the control of plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU) for more than three decades, including initiatives to end the production of plutonium and HEU for weapons (Fissile Material Cutoff Treaty); the use of highly enriched uranium as a reactor fuel (the Global Threat Reduction Initia­tive); and plutonium separation from spent nuclear fuel.

From 1983 to 1991, while Frank was chairman of the Federation of American Scientists (FAS) and the FAS Fund, he partnered with the Committee of Soviet Scientists for Peace and Against the Nuclear Threat (chaired by Evgenyi Velikhov) to help provide technical support for Mikhail Gorbachev’s initiatives to achieve a Comprehensive Test Ban, and the Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces and Strategic Arms Reductions Treaties.

From 1993 to 1994, he served as assistant director for national se­curity in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and played a major role in developing what is now called the International Nuclear Materials Protection and Cooperation Program.

In 2006, Frank co-founded and is currently co-chair of the non­governmental International Panel on Fissile Materials, which includes experts from 17 countries and develops proposals for initiatives to re­duce global stocks of plutonium and HEU and the numbers of locations where they can be found.

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