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Authority record

Chingford Hospital

  • Corporate body
  • 1901-1996

From Lost Hospitals of London: https://ezitis.myzen.co.uk/chingford.html By 1893 the population of Walthamstow had greatly increased and, when Plaistow and Highgate Hospitals refused to take any more smallpox patients from the area, the need for a municipal isolation hospital became urgent. For this purpose Larkswood Lodge, with 20 acres, off Hale End Road (later renamed Larkshall Road) was bought by the Walthamstow Urban District Council for £2623. The Walthamstow Sanatorium (or Isolation Hospital) opened in 1901, having cost £33,364 to build. The opening ceremony was held in one of the wards and a 'goodly number' turned up for it, creating a crowd problem. The ground floor of the two-storey administration block contained offices, a sitting room and bedroom for the doctor, sitting rooms for Matron and the nurses, as well as dining rooms for the nurses and the servants. The kitchen, scullery, pantries and storerooms were also on this floor. On the first floor, as well as bathrooms, were bedrooms for Matron, 18 nurses and the servants. Gas was used for cooking and heating; indeed, the Hospital made its own gas (the cost of this was 2d (0.8p) per 1000 cubic ft compared with 7d (3p) for coal gas. The ward accommodation consisted of three pavilions containing 14 beds each, as well as a nurse's room with kitchen and bathroom. There was also a small 4-bedded observation ward. A mortuary was discreetly hidden behind trees at the rear of the site. The engine-house contained two 28 BHP gas engines of the Westinghouse type, which generated electricity for lighting and driving the laundry machines. Patients arrived by horse-drawn ambulances and were admitted to the observation ward for assessment before being transferred to one of the main wards. In 1904 an agreement was reached to admit diphtheria patients from Chingford. The Hospital was enlarged in 1905, with additional bedroom and sitting room accommodation for six nurses and five maids in the administration block. A bacteriological laboratory and office were also built, as well as a 2-storey block for 24 convalescent patients, with a day room on the first floor. By this time the Hospital had 72 beds. A pavilion for patients with tuberculosis (TB) opened in 1914. The new building was divided into six compartments, with two beds in each. At the west end there was a room for two acute patients, with bedrooms for the nurse and ward maid and, at the east end, a small kitchen and dining room. In 1938 the Leyton Council bought a half-share in the Hospital and it became known as the Leyton and Walthamstow Joint Hospital. At the begi ing of WW2 a First Aid post with a Gas Cleansing Section was established at the Hospital. In 1940 and 1941 the Hospital was bombed, but little damage occurred. In 1946 it was renamed the Walthamstow Infectious Diseases Hospital and Sanatorium. In 1948 it joined the NHS, when it had 100 beds for patients with infectious diseases and 18 beds for those with TB. In the following year the war damage was repaired. By 1953 the Hospital had ceased to deal solely with infectious diseases, becoming a general hospital providing postoperative (no surgery was performed here), medical and orthopaedic treatment. It was renamed Chingford Hospital. In 1956 a new Out-Patients Department opened, at the cost of £24,000. Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy Departments were added in 1958. By 1970 Chingford Hospital had become a busy acute general hospital with 100 beds. The closure of Co aught Hospital in 1977 was expected to affect the role of Chingford Hospital, making funds available for improvements and expansion. Plans were made to sell off five acres of land, while retaining the rest for a possible Health Centre. In 1978 the former TB ward was converted to a medical ward for female patients and renamed Larkshall Ward. Throughout the 1980s there was much debate about the future of the Hospital, as to whether it should become a community hospital for the care and rehabilitation of local people (so there would be no need for the elderly to go to Langthorne Hospital), and a Health Clinic with family pla ing, a baby clinic, chiropody and occupational therapy. The terminally ill would be sent to Whipps Cross Hospital. At this time the Hospital had 58 beds for geriatric patients and 15 beds for younger disabled people. The in-patients side closed in 1991 but the Out-Patients Department continued until 1996, when the Hospital finally closed.

Woodford Jubilee Hospital

  • Corporate body
  • 1899-1986

From Lost Hospitals of London: https://ezitis.myzen.co.uk/woodfordjubilee.html The Hospital, financed by Sir John Roberts, Bt, was built to celebrate Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee. It opened in 1899 with 12 beds. The patients were looked after by their GPs. In 1911 it was extended to 54 beds, the money being raised by public subscription. In 1937 a new X-ray room and apparatus were installed. The women's ward was extended, with an additional 6 beds. The work cost £3,877. In 1948 the Hospital joined the NHS under the control of the Forest Group Hospital Management Committee, part of the North East Metropolitan Regional Hospital Board. In 1974, following a major reorganisation of the NHS, it came under the administration of the West Roding District Health Authority, part of the North East Thames Regional Health Board. Following another major reorganisation of the NHS in 1982, it transferred to the control of the Waltham Forest District Health Authority. The Hospital closed in 1986 under the orders of the then Health Minister, Ke eth Clarke, because it was considered too small, with only 47 beds.

Oldchurch Hospital

  • Corporate body
  • 1929-2006

From Lost Hospitals of London: https://ezitis.myzen.co.uk/oldchurch.html Oldchurch Hospital originated from the Romford Union workhouse, which had been built during 1838 and 1839 to the southwest of Romford. The 5-acre site on Oldchurch Road was purchased by the Union from a Mr Philpot at £160 an acre. The 2-storey workhouse building was cruciform, a popular design with the dormitory blocks laid out in a cross-shape. It could house 450 inmates. The administration block was at the south of the site, while the main accommodation blocks radiated from a central hub. Observation windows in the hub enabled the workhouse master to observe the inmates in each of the four exercise yards. The dormitories and Day Rooms for the female inmates were on the eastern side in the northeast and southeast arms of the cross, while the males occupied the western side in the northwest and southwest arms. The kitchens and dining rooms were located at the north of the building. In 1893 the workhouse was renamed the Romford Poor Law Institution. An infirmary block was added at the north of the site. During WW1 the infirmary of the Institution became the Romford Military Hospital, an auxiliary hospital for the Colchester Military Hospital, with 82 beds for wounded and sick servicemen. In 1924 further additions were built at the north and east of the site. In 1929, following the abolition of the Poor Law Guardians, the workhouse and its infirmary came under the administration of Essex County Council, who converted the buildings into the Oldchurch County Hospital. The Hospital, which incorporated the old workhouse buildings, was much expanded during the 1930s to have over 800 beds. Hainault Lodge became an a exe to provide accommodation for elderly chronically ill female patients. During WW2 it joined the Emergency Medical Service (EMS) with 868 beds, of which 96 were EMS beds for air-raid casualties. In 1948 the Hospital joined the NHS under the control of the Romford Group Hospital Management Committee, part of the North East Metropolitan Regional Hospital Board. In 1950 it had 750 beds for general and maternity cases but, by 1952, some 718 beds. It remained an acute hospital and, by 1962, it had 651 beds for acute and maternity patients. In 1974, following a major reorganisation of the NHS, the Hospital came under the control of the Havering District Health Authority, part of the Barking and Havering Area Health Authority of the North East Thames Regional Health Authority. Its maternity services had closed and it had 629 beds for acute cases. In 1980 it had 600 beds. In 1982, after another NHS reorganisation, it came under the control of the Barking, Havering and Brentwood District Health Authority. By 1986 it had 530 beds. In 1993, following another NHS reform, the Hospital was under the control of the Havering Hospitals NHS Trust. In 2000 it had 473 beds. Despite local opposition, the old cruciform workhouse building was demolished so that a temporary single-storey building could be erected in its place. In 2003 the Hospital was administered by the Barking, Havering and Redbridge NHS Trust. By 2005 there were 565 beds. The Hospital closed in 2006, with the last patient being seen on 15th December. Services were transferred to the nearby newly built Queen's Hospital and to the King George Hospital in Chadwell Heath.

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