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Constable, John

  • Personne
  • 1952-

John Constable is an English playwright, poet, performer and activist, author of The Southwark Mysteries. He is also known as John Crow, the urban shaman of Cross Bones.

John Constable was made an honorary fellow of the University in 2010.

National College for Heating, Ventilating, Refrigeration and Fan Engineering

  • AR/6
  • Collectivité
  • 1948-1970

In December 1945 the Education Board for the Heating and Ventilating Industry set up a committee to look into the possibility of establishing a National School for the Heating and Ventilating Industries. This was in response to the Percy Report which recommended that National Schools associated with certain industries should be established. In 1946, with the agreement of the National Association of Heating, Ventilating and Domestic Engineering Employers, discussions were opened with the Ministry of Education on the establishment of a National School. These proposals were well received and in January 1947 a memorandum, drawn up by the Ministry on National Colleges, and financial arrangements were discussed by the Ministry and the Board. It was agreed that Industry should pay £50 per student per session with a guaranteed minimum of £1000 per year. The National Association also agreed to this and in April 1947 it was decided that a National College for Heating and Ventilating, Refrigeration and Fan Engineering be formed within the Borough Polytechnic. The agreement of the London County Council was secured in November 1947 and the first meeting of the Board of Governors of the newly established National College for Heating, Ventilating, Refrigeration and Fan Engineering was held on 20 January 1948 at the Borough Polytechnic.The first Chair of Governors was Hubert Secretan and there were representatives from the three industries on the Board of Governors. There were high hopes for the new College and the third annual report of the Education Board for the Heating and Ventilating Industry hoped 'it will be the centre for the highest grade of technological training for the industry and will be in close contact with the most up-to-date development and research' (NC/7/2/3). The College existed to meet the needs of the industries and had two principal aims: to provide a high standard of technological training and to undertake research.In its first session, commencing in September 1948, the College offered full-time Diploma courses in the three industries: Heating and Ventilating Engineering, Refrigeration Engineering and Fan Engineering. The College also offered part-time day or evening refresher courses for those employed in industry. Courses led to diplomas after full-time study for two terms, and later one year, or an Associateship of the National College with post graduate or post HND entry.The College was, from its inception, closely linked with the Borough Polytechnic. Its premises were located within the grounds of the Borough Polytechnic Annexe and the College used the facilities of the Polytechnic for teaching ancillary subjects. Before the National College was established the Polytechnic had become the principal college in heating and ventilating engineering in London. A lecturer in heating and ventilating engineering had been appointed in 1917 for evening courses and after World War 1 part-time day classes were introduced. At first, the college was heavily dependent on service teaching from other departments of Borough Polytechnic, especially mechanical engineering, mathematics and humanities, but began to widen its work by undertaking research.The College was given a logo of a shield divided into four, representing the three industries and the Borough Polytechnic. It also had a motto, 'e tribus unum', meaning 'one from three'.In the 1950s the accommodation within the Borough Polytechnic was too small to allow the continued expansion of student numbers and to undertake research. The Ministry of Education agreed to cover the costs of the building and industry donated money to purchase new equipment. The new building on Southwark Bridge Road (now the Faraday Wing) was opened to students in September 1960.By the 1960s government policy had moved away from National Colleges which taught a limited syllabus. The Ministry of Education preferred Technical Education Institutions to provide a broader education than covered by the National Colleges and in 1964 it began discussions with the National College on its future. Due to a Government White Paper of 1966 entitled 'A Plan for Polytechnics' it was proposed that a new Polytechnic should be established by merging the Borough Polytechnic with the National College, Brixton School of Building and City of Westminster College.In September 1970 these four colleges merged to become the Polytechnic of the South Bank. In effect, the National College became the Polytechnic's Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology.

Policy Committee

  • Collectivité
  • 26 February 1981-12 January 1984

The Policy Committee was established in 1981 as a sub-committee of the Council with the following terms of reference:

-To review the Polytechnic's activities;

-To determine strategic policy for the development of the Polytechnic;

-To work in co-operation with the Strategic Planning Committee of the Academic Board;

-To review general provision for student support services.

Committee for Student Affairs

  • Collectivité
  • 1992-2011

The Committee for Student Affairs acted as an advisory forum at which representatives of the Student Union could raise matters of concern to senior management. It had the right to make recommendations to the Executive Board, Board of Governors and the Academic Board. The Committee was originally called the Joint Committee for Student Affairs, but was renamed the Committee for Student Affairs in September 1992 after revising its membership and terms of reference. The Committee was disbanded and the final meeting held in June 2011.

Appointments Committee

  • Collectivité

The Appointments Committee was established in December 1990 and exists to consider and ratify recommendations from the Nominations Committee to appoint people to sit on the Board of Governors. It is a committee of the Board of Governors.

New Kent Road halls of residence

  • Collectivité
  • 1907-

New Kent Road Halls of Residence at 83 New Kent Road, Southwark were built in 1905 on the site of a large villa. The building originally housed the Morning Post Embankment Home and also the Borthwick Teaching Training College. The site was purchased by the Polytechnic to house Rachel McMillan College's Education courses. The Polytechnic's nursery was briefly housed there until it moved to the George Overend Building on Keyworth Street (now the site of K2). During 1989-90 the building was converted into halls of residence and is still in use.

Eileen House

  • Collectivité

Eileen House is a tower block comprising a basement, ground floor, and seven upper floors. It was leased by the University from Southwark County Council until 2012 and housed the Human Resources, Staff Development and Building Services teams.

Turney Road Sports Ground

  • Collectivité

The University has had sports facilities in Dulwich from very early on. The Borough Polytechnic initially rented a field at Red Post Hill from the Governors of the Dulwich College Estate as a space for athletics. As the Institute grew the field became insufficient and in 1909 a larger field of nine acres was leased at Burbage Road and Turney Road. and the first sports ground was built on by William Penn School. In 1933 the playing field was extended by an additional eleven acres and in 1938 a pavilion was built, which was used during WW2 by the Army for barrage balloons.

South Bank Polytechnic Student Union

  • Collectivité
  • 1970s-1992

The Student Union moved to a building in Rotary Street during the 1970s and remained there until 1990 when it moved to the George Overend Building on Keyworth Street.

Stanley Gymnasium

  • Collectivité

The Stanley Gymnasium was used by female staff and students of the Borough Polytechnic Institute and was opened in November 1904. By the 1970s it was no longer used as a gymnasium and was known as Stanley Hall. It was briefly used to house the Borough Road library from 1975 until it transferred to the new library in London Road Building.

David Bomberg House

  • Collectivité
  • 1999-

The hall of residence at 282-302 Borough High Street was built between June 1999 and September 2000 and was named after David Bomberg who taught Art at the Borough Polytechnic from 1945-1953 and is today recognised as one of the most notable British painters of the twentieth century.

Manor House, Battersea College of Education

  • Collectivité
  • 1950-1990s

Manor House, situated on Clapham Common Northside in Wandsworth was built in the early 19th Century and was originally called The Beeches. A grammar school for boys used it from 1906 adding several extensions and closing in 1939. The building was requisitioned by the Army during World War 2 and afterwards offered to the Battersea Domestic Science Department who moved there by September 1950. From then on Manor House was used by Battersea College of Education, who added two major extensions and went on to merge with the Polytechnic of the South Bank in 1976. The training of teachers and Domestic Economy took place there until South Bank University sold the site in the 1990s.

Whipps Cross campus, South Bank University

  • AR/31
  • Collectivité
  • 2001-2011

Whipps Cross campus was established in 2001, along with Havering Campus, after South Bank University merged with the Redwood College of Health Studies. The campus closed in 2011.

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