Showing 613 results

Authority record

Cadogan Court

  • Corporate body

Cadogan Court was a halls of residence for the Battersea Training College.

Caxton House

  • Corporate body
  • 1920s-present

Caxton House at 13-16 Borough Road was built in the 1920s for printing union NATSOPA by E J Williams Architects of Leicester and later used by SOGAT 81. The building was purchased by South Bank Polytechnic in 1988 to house students and staff from Rachel McMillan College. In 1992 it housed the Administration Department of the Polytechnic, including the Vice-Chancellor and later housed the University's staff from the Centre for Learning Support & Development, including the Careers Centre. It currently houses staff from the Confucius Institute, following a 2015 refurbishment carried out by Rivington Street Studio.

Centenary celebrations

  • Corporate body
  • 1992

South Bank Polytechnic celebrated its centenary with a year's worth of celebrations, beginning with the Director, Pauline Perry releasing balloons from the Tower Restaurant. Other events included a service of thanksgiving, a special lunch at the Guildhall in London and dinner dance in Edric Hall.
The Centenary Lunch was held at the Guildhall, London and was hosted by the Vice Chancellor, Pauline Perry and the Liverymen of the Worshipful Company of Bakers. A recipe book, "The Lightest Chocolate Mousse in the World" was put together by the National Bakery School as part of the celebrations.

Chantler, Cyril; Sir

  • Person
  • 1939-

Sir Cyril Chantler GBE FRCP FRCPCH FMedSci is a British paediatric nephrologist. Chantler was notable for devising a method with Norman Veale of measuring glomerular function in children and later researched diet and growth failure in children with renal impairment. Chantler was most notable for holding an independent review of public health evidence for standardised tobacco packaging that later became known as the Chantler Review that led to standardised packaging for tobacco and cigarette packets.
Sir Cyril Chantler was made an Honorary Doctor of Science of the University in November 1999.

Charitable Funds Committee

  • Corporate body
  • 1985-2012

The Charitable Funds Committee was a committee of the Board of Governors which exercised custodianship over originally the Polytechnic and then the University's charitable funds and ensured that these were allocated appropriately. The final meeting was held in December 2012.

Charity Commission

  • Corporate body

Approved by the Board of Charity Commissioners on 12 August 1892.

Charles West School of Nursing

  • AR/22
  • Corporate body
  • 1960-1995

Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children opened on 14 February 1852 as a result of a campaign by Dr Charles West and Dr Henry Bence-Jones to establish a hospital solely for children, which until that point did not exist in Great Britain. Formal nursing training was introduced in 1878 and in 1960 a new School of Nursing building was officially opened on 31 March 1960 by Princess Alexandra. The Charles West School of Nursing merged with South Bank University in 1995.

Chase, Graham

  • Person

Graham Chase was born in North-West London. While still at school, he won an RAF Flying Scholarship which led to him securing his private pilots licence at the age of just 19. He went on to study at the Willesden College of Professional Building and qualified as an associate of the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors in 1980.

Graham began his career as a property manager with the BBC, eventually rising to head up some 200 surveyors across the UK at Colliers Erdman Lewis. In 1995, he set up his own practice, Chase and Partners, providing development advice and consultancy in the retail and leisure property sectors. Graham advised on the £350 million acquisition of the Iceland Group and Booker Group and the £700 million financing deal for the Agora and Catalyst shopping centre portfolios and is currently working to secure equity stakeholders for a $5 billion regeneration and redevelopment project in Chicago.

A fellow of the RICS since 1988 – and president between 2006 and 2007 – Graham is also a member of the Court of the Worshipful Company of Chartered Surveyors and current chair of the Education Committee since 2011. He advises the government on property issues, and is President of the Association of Town Centre Management. He sits on the RICS President's Arbitrators and Independent Experts Panel and is regularly called on as an expert witness.

A passionate advocate for education, Graham chairs the Joint Oxford Study Weekend and is a founder and director of the CPD Foundation. He is also a trustee, governor and director of Alford House, a youth club based in Lambeth. Chase and Partners have sponsored Saracens Rugby Club since it turned professional in 1995.

He was made an Honorary Fellow in July 2012.

Cheung, Steven; Dr

  • Person

Dr Steven Cheung was made an Honorary Doctor of Science in 1992.

Chingford Hospital

  • Corporate body
  • 1901-1996

From Lost Hospitals of London: https://ezitis.myzen.co.uk/chingford.html By 1893 the population of Walthamstow had greatly increased and, when Plaistow and Highgate Hospitals refused to take any more smallpox patients from the area, the need for a municipal isolation hospital became urgent. For this purpose Larkswood Lodge, with 20 acres, off Hale End Road (later renamed Larkshall Road) was bought by the Walthamstow Urban District Council for £2623. The Walthamstow Sanatorium (or Isolation Hospital) opened in 1901, having cost £33,364 to build. The opening ceremony was held in one of the wards and a 'goodly number' turned up for it, creating a crowd problem. The ground floor of the two-storey administration block contained offices, a sitting room and bedroom for the doctor, sitting rooms for Matron and the nurses, as well as dining rooms for the nurses and the servants. The kitchen, scullery, pantries and storerooms were also on this floor. On the first floor, as well as bathrooms, were bedrooms for Matron, 18 nurses and the servants. Gas was used for cooking and heating; indeed, the Hospital made its own gas (the cost of this was 2d (0.8p) per 1000 cubic ft compared with 7d (3p) for coal gas. The ward accommodation consisted of three pavilions containing 14 beds each, as well as a nurse's room with kitchen and bathroom. There was also a small 4-bedded observation ward. A mortuary was discreetly hidden behind trees at the rear of the site. The engine-house contained two 28 BHP gas engines of the Westinghouse type, which generated electricity for lighting and driving the laundry machines. Patients arrived by horse-drawn ambulances and were admitted to the observation ward for assessment before being transferred to one of the main wards. In 1904 an agreement was reached to admit diphtheria patients from Chingford. The Hospital was enlarged in 1905, with additional bedroom and sitting room accommodation for six nurses and five maids in the administration block. A bacteriological laboratory and office were also built, as well as a 2-storey block for 24 convalescent patients, with a day room on the first floor. By this time the Hospital had 72 beds. A pavilion for patients with tuberculosis (TB) opened in 1914. The new building was divided into six compartments, with two beds in each. At the west end there was a room for two acute patients, with bedrooms for the nurse and ward maid and, at the east end, a small kitchen and dining room. In 1938 the Leyton Council bought a half-share in the Hospital and it became known as the Leyton and Walthamstow Joint Hospital. At the begi ing of WW2 a First Aid post with a Gas Cleansing Section was established at the Hospital. In 1940 and 1941 the Hospital was bombed, but little damage occurred. In 1946 it was renamed the Walthamstow Infectious Diseases Hospital and Sanatorium. In 1948 it joined the NHS, when it had 100 beds for patients with infectious diseases and 18 beds for those with TB. In the following year the war damage was repaired. By 1953 the Hospital had ceased to deal solely with infectious diseases, becoming a general hospital providing postoperative (no surgery was performed here), medical and orthopaedic treatment. It was renamed Chingford Hospital. In 1956 a new Out-Patients Department opened, at the cost of £24,000. Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy Departments were added in 1958. By 1970 Chingford Hospital had become a busy acute general hospital with 100 beds. The closure of Co aught Hospital in 1977 was expected to affect the role of Chingford Hospital, making funds available for improvements and expansion. Plans were made to sell off five acres of land, while retaining the rest for a possible Health Centre. In 1978 the former TB ward was converted to a medical ward for female patients and renamed Larkshall Ward. Throughout the 1980s there was much debate about the future of the Hospital, as to whether it should become a community hospital for the care and rehabilitation of local people (so there would be no need for the elderly to go to Langthorne Hospital), and a Health Clinic with family pla ing, a baby clinic, chiropody and occupational therapy. The terminally ill would be sent to Whipps Cross Hospital. At this time the Hospital had 58 beds for geriatric patients and 15 beds for younger disabled people. The in-patients side closed in 1991 but the Out-Patients Department continued until 1996, when the Hospital finally closed.

City of Westminster College

  • AR/9
  • Corporate body
  • c1915-1970

City of Westminster College has its origins in an evening institute established in the First World War providing lip-reading classes for deafened servicemen in the vestry of St George's Church in Hanover Square, Westminster. The institute, which became known as St George's Institute, only ran evening classes and moved to a number of different sites, successively St George's Row School, Ebury Bridge and Dean Farrar Street. A further move was made to the Burdett Cookery School, with some classes held in the Townsend Foundation School, Rochester Row. The institute grew rapidly during the 1930s, becoming one of the largest commercial institutes in London, with classrooms and chemistry laboratories in Westminster City College. In 1936 an arrangement with Westminster Training College was made enabling the institute to provide more student hours than any comparable institute in London and replacing the link with Westminster City College. The institute moved again to the Millbank School, Erasmus Street.
In 1939 two social studies courses were introduced, whilst languages and commercial, administrative and social studies were all well established.The Waterloo Road School site was taken over by the institute in 1951, shared with the Law Department of Kennington College. By 1959 there were 41 full-time staff, more part-time lecturers and over 30 rooms used. Full-time courses were offered in 1959 in the institute's three departments of Civil Service, Commerce and University Entrance, with part-time and evening work. In 1954 the institute moved to Francis House, renting space from the Army and Navy Stores. Further space was rented from them in 1955, enabling matriculation work to be transferred from Regent Street Polytechnic. New departments of Science, Social Studies and Day Release work were created. Awards and courses were rationalised following the 1959 McMeeking report 'Further Education in Commerce', with the introduction of national certificates in business studies, and establishment of new departments of Economics and Arts and Science and Maths. By 1962 there were over 6000 students associated with the institute. In 1965 the work of the Arts Department was transferred to the West London College of Commerce.
In 1959 the institute was renamed City of Westminster College. In the early 1960s the first courses in Hospital Administration were organised, and part of the college moved in 1966 to Blackfriars Road where housing laboratories and the Social Studies Department were accommodated (later to become part of Southwark College). In the mid 1960s new departments of Professional Studies, later renamed Accountancy and Finance, and Business Studies were established. The publication of the White Paper 'A Plan for Polytechnics and Other Colleges', published in 1966, had announced the creation of some 30 polytechnics throughout the country to form what became called the public sector of the binary system of higher education. The 13 existing colleges managed by ILEA were to be reorganised into five. City of Westminster College joined with Borough Polytechnic, the Brixton School of Building, and the National College for Heating, Ventilating, Refrigeration and Fan Engineering to become the Polytechnic of the South Bank in 1970.

The premises were used by the new Polytechnic for a short time after the merger to house the Department of Accountacy and Finance, the Department of Business Studies, the Department of Languages and the Department of Management and Administration.

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